FANDOM


Alice in Wonderland (1931) is an independently made black-and-white Pre-Code American film based on Lewis Carroll's 1865 novel Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, directed by Bud Pollard, produced by Hugo Maienthau, and filmed at Metropolitan Studios in Fort Lee, New Jersey.

This was the first sound version of the story, and therefore the first film in which Carroll's original dialogue was heard,[1][2] the film starred Ruth Gilbert as Alice and Leslie King as the Mad Hatter. The film opened at the Warner Theatre in New York City.

Synopsis

Alice (Ruth Gilbert) meets the White Rabbit (Ralph Hertz), the bad-tempered Cook (Lillian Ardell) and the Duchess (Mabel Wright). She joins a mad tea-party with the Mad Hatter (Leslie King), the March Hare (Meyer Berensen) and the Dormouse (Raymond Schultz), while the Cheshire Cat (Tom Corless) leaves his grin behind.

The Caterpillar (Jimmy Rosen) becomes annoyed with her, and the Queen of Hearts (Vie Quinn) threatens to cut off her head. With the Duchess, Alice meets the Mock Turtle (Gus Alexander) and the Gryphon (Charles Silvern), and at a bizarre trial, Alice finally becomes fed up with all the strange events and people.[3]

Cast

Background

This low-budget film was made in 1931 at the Metropolitan Studios in Fort Lee, New Jersey, possibly with a cast of amateur actors, many of whom struggled to reproduce British accents. It came out one year before the centenary of the birth of Lewis Carroll, which event was causing a wave of 'Alice' fever on both sides of the Atlantic.[1]

In the United States, a number of 'Alice in Wonderland' plays, films, songs and puppet shows in the early 1930s attempted to cash in on this Carroll and 'Alice' fever. For example, in the Betty Boop cartoon Betty in Blunderland Betty went to Wonderland, as did Eva Le Gallienne in a 1932 Broadway adaptation that combined Alice in Wonderland with Through the Looking Glass, and which was one of the hits of the year.

Meanwhile, Paramount Pictures was preparing a big-budget Alice in Wonderland which starred an unknown, Charlotte Henry, with an all-star cast that featured W.C. Fields, Cary Grant and Gary Cooper. In 1932, Alice Liddell, the inspiration for the 'Alice' of the original books, and by now an elderly lady, visited America to take part in these centenary celebrations.[2]

The film opened at the prestigious Warner Theatre in New York City. However, the film was not financially successful and received little critical attention. Today, it is rarely if ever shown, and for a time there was even some doubt as to whether prints of it still existed. It has never been shown on television.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Alice in Wonderland (1931), fortleefilm.org; accessed July 23, 2015.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "'Curiouser and curiouser' - Alice in Film", NorthJersey.com; accessed July 23, 2015.
  3. Film review, ovguide.com; accessed July 23, 2015.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Through the Looking-Glass - "The Hunting of the Snark"
Characters
Alice - White Rabbit - Dodo - Bill the Lizard - Caterpillar - Duchess - Cheshire Cat - March Hare - Hatter - Dormouse - Queen of Hearts
King of Hearts - Knave of Hearts - Gryphon - Mock Turtle - Red Queen - White Queen - Red King - White King - White Knight
Tweedledum and Tweedledee - Sheep - Humpty Dumpty - The Lion and the Unicorn - Bandersnatch - Jubjub bird
Locations
Wonderland - Looking-glass world
Related topics
The Annotated Alice - Mischmasch - Works based on Alice in Wonderland (Films and television - Disney franchise)
Translations of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Translations of Through the Looking-Glass
Adaptations
Films
1903 - 1910 - 1915 - 1931 - 1933 - 1949 - 1951 - 1966 - 1972 - 1976 - 1982 - 1985 - 1987 - 1988 (Czechoslovak) - 1988 (Australian)
1995 - 1999 - 2010
Stage
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (ballet) - Alice in Wonderland (musical) - Alice in Wonderland (opera)
But Never Jam Today (Carroll musical) - Wonderland (Wildhorn musical) - Peter and Alice (2013 play) - Wonder.land (Albarn musical)
Television
Fushigi no Kuni no Alice - Once Upon a Time in Wonderland
Poems
"All in the golden afternoon..." - "How Doth the Little Crocodile" - "The Mouse's Tale" - "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Bat"
"You Are Old, Father William" - "'Tis the Voice of the Lobster" - "Jabberwocky" - "The Walrus and the Carpenter" - "Haddocks' Eyes"
"The Mock Turtle's Song" - "The Hunting of the Snark"
Sequels
A New Alice in the Old Wonderland (1895) - New Adventures of Alice (1917) - Alice of Wonderland in Paris (1966)
Alice Through the Needle's Eye (1984) - Automated Alice (1996) - Wonderland Revisited and the Games Alice Played There (2009)
Retellings
The Nursery "Alice" (1890) - Alice's Adventures in Wonderland retold in words of one syllable (1905)
Alice in Verse: The Lost Rhymes of Wonderland (2010)
Parodies
The Westminster Alice (1902) - Clara in Blunderland (1902) - Lost in Blunderland (1903)
John Bull's Adventures in the Fiscal Wonderland (1904) - Alice in Blunderland: An Iridescent Dream (1904)
Imitations
Davy and the Goblin (1884) - The Admiral's Caravan (1891) - Gladys in Grammarland (1896) - A New Wonderland (1898)
Rollo in Emblemland (1902) - Justnowland (1912) - Alice in Orchestralia (1925)
Reimagining
Alice in Wonderland or What's a Nice Kid Like You Doing in a Place Like This? (1966) - Alice or the Last Escapade (1977) - Dreamchild (1985)
Adventures in Wonderland (1991) - The Looking Glass Wars (2006) - Alice (2009) - Malice in Wonderland (2009)
Alice in Wonderland (2010) - Alice Through the Looking Glass (2016)
Literary
Alice in Murderland - Alice in the Country of Hearts - Miyuki-chan in Wonderland
Video games
Alice no Paint Adventure (1995) - Alice in Wonderland (2000) - American McGee's Alice (2000) - Alice in Wonderland (2010)
Alice: Madness Returns (2011)